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We have implemented provisions in the USCIS Policy Manual that provide guidance on customer service and safe address procedures for individuals protected under 8 U.S.C. 1367. The confidentiality provisions at 8 U.S.C. 1367 protect information about individuals who have pending or approved victim-based immigration relief, specifically relief under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), such as Form I-360 VAWA self-petitions and Form I-751 waivers based on battery or extreme cruelty, T nonimmigrant status applications or U nonimmigrant status petitions, and their derivatives and beneficiaries.

USCIS has established specific procedures to improve access to information and customer service (PDF, 332.75 KB) for these protected individuals through the USCIS Contact Center, while continuing to protect their privacy and follow statutory confidentiality provisions. Protected individuals may now submit inquiries or request a service by calling the USCIS Contact Center or sending a secure message from their USCIS online account.

The USCIS Contact Center will ask specific questions to verify a caller’s identity before providing services. See the “Inquiries for VAWA, T, and U Filings (Including Form I-751 Abuse Waivers)” section of our Contact Us webpage for important information. Callers should have documents ready, if possible, for reference when sending a secure message and during the call:

  • A receipt notice for each form they are asking about; and

  • A copy of relevant pending or approved applications or petitions.



Please, contact Darren Heyman, a Las Vegas Immigration Attorney, for more information.

President Biden’s new immigration policy protects some 500,000 people who are married to U.S. citizens from deportation and gives them a pathway to citizenship.

The election-year move comes just two weeks after Mr. Biden imposed a major crackdown at the U.S.-Mexico border, cutting off access to asylum for people who crossed into the United States illegally.

The policy announced on Tuesday is aimed at people who have been living in the United States for more than a decade and have built their lives and families here.

Here is how it works:



Please, contact Darren Heyman, a Las Vegas Immigration Attorney, for more information.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) expanded the parole in place (PIP) policy to include certain undocumented spouses of United States citizens who have been in the country for more than ten years, by June 17, the date of the announcement. 

PIP is a term used to describe the admission of immigrants who are already present in the United States and who have entered the country without inspection. In the past it has been granted by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to certain relatives of military members and veterans, with the goal of minimizing family separation.

The new policy is expands eligibility to certain undocumented spouses of U.S. citizens who have been in the country for more than ten years, on a case-by-case basis. Those who are granted parole in place are considered to have lawful status for immigration purposes.



Please, contact Darren Heyman, a Las Vegas Immigration Attorney, for more information.


Read the latest updates on the US immigration, green cards, visas and more:

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